Our series of courses and seminars provide training and technical skills in the repair and maintenance of historic and traditionally built structures. They are aimed at people wishing to upskill, train or develop practical knowledge in the field of the historic built environment, including architects, surveyors, planners, project managers and supervisors, and anyone with a general interest in historic buildings and materials.

Most courses and seminars take place over a half or full day, and consist of a mixture of lectures and practical demonstrations, sometimes including a site visit in Dublin city centre to inspect conservation works in progress. Presently, all seminars and lectures are taking place online via the Zoom platform.

Courses are rated for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) by the Royal Institute of Architects of Ireland and The Society of Chartered Surveyors, and most events are considered applicable for CPD by other professional bodies. Participants are issued with a certificate of attendance upon request.

Sign up to our Newsletter on the home page for regular updates on Courses, Seminars and Events.

 

CURRENT SEMINARS - WINTER 2021

Our next two events in early December have just gone live with booking details below:

Terracotta, Faience and Brick Specials
Approaches to Repair and Reproduction
With Shane Nolan, Director, Nolan's Group Conservation & Restoration

Webinar via Zoom

Wednesday 1st December 2021
10:00-13:00

 

Traditional Timber Windows
History, Repair and Thermal Upgrading
With Dr Nessa Roche and Gary Beirne, Historic Window Restoration

Webinar via Zoom

Wednesday 8th December 2021
10:00-13:00


See below for further details

Terracotta, Faience & Brick Specials
Approaches to Repair & Reproduction

Morning Webinar 

Date: Wednesday 1st December 2021

Time: 10:00 – 13:00 (webinar open for admittance from 09:45)

Price: €60

CPD Points: 3

Format: Live webinar via Zoom

Recording: A recording of the webinar will be made available for a two-week period to all attendees and to ticket-holders who cannot attend on the day.

BOOK ONLINE HERE

 

 

Dublin Civic Trust's 2021 Education Programme is supported by the Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage

Dublin Civic Trust's 2021 Education Programme is supported by the Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage

WEBINAR CONTENT

This half-day webinar is led by Shane Nolan, Director of Nolan’s Group conservation contractors who have developed a specialism in the repair and manufacturing of bespoke brick and clay products for building conservation works.

Decorative fired clay and brick products reached their peak of production and widespread application in Irish buildings in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They are associated with the architectural eclecticism of the Victorian age that promoted a variety of styles ranging from Tudor and Elizabethan Revival, European Renaissance to the neoclassical revival of the 1880s-1920s. Combining these moulded materials created boundless opportunities for architectural expression and structural assembly. Materials such as terracotta were durable and resistant to weathering when subjected to good maintenance. Faience, with its distinctive glazed finish, could be produced in a diverse range of styles and was regularly chosen for its low maintenance qualities for use in Irish shopfronts and commercial interiors

Today, options for repairing and replicating missing or damaged elements are often hampered by poor diagnosis, lack of knowledge of the specific properties of products, and the limited availability of replacements and manufacturing skills. Likewise, sourcing appropriate salvaged brick can be a fraught process, where sourcing bespoke specials is often a preferable option.

In this three-hour webinar, with three opportunities for questions and answers, Shane Nolan will guide attendees through the composition of terracotta, faience and fired-clay materials, the manufacturing process, and the logistics of commissioning repairs and reproduction items. Through the use of numerous site case studies, including the manufacturing of brick specials, the webinar will also showcase how complex facades and rooflines, often featuring a combination of materials, can be sensitively repaired – sometimes with new design solutions to resolve inherent flaws in the original design. The webinar will provide a unique insight into this commonly overlooked area.

 

PROGRAMME

10:00
Welcome & Introduction

10:05
Terracotta: Composition, Repairs and Reproduction
Plus case studies

Q&A

11:05
Break

11:15
Faience: Glazing, Colouring, Repairs
Plus case studies

Q&A

12:15
Break

12:20
Brick Specials: Matching mixes, colouring and firing
Plus case studies

Q&A

13:00
Close

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY

Shane Nolan is Director of Nolans Group Conservation & Restoration, a well-respected specialist conservation firm working in the Irish conservation field for 25 years.

The firm employs a team of highly skilled employees, offering a combination of traditional skills and innovative repair techniques to cater for the conservation and sustainability demands presented by historic buildings. Nolan’s has worked on some of Ireland’s largest and most significant conservation projects, ranging from McKee Barracks for the Department of Defence to one of the largest Georgian mansions in Dublin at Number 3 Henrietta Street.

Shane Nolan maintains a keen interest in the use, development and promotion of building limes, sensitive masonry repair and cleaning techniques, and serves on the board of the Building Limes Forum Ireland.

Shane Nolan, Director, Nolan's Group

Shane Nolan, Director, Nolan's Group

Traditional Timber Windows -
History, Repair & Thermal Upgrading

Morning Webinar 

Date: Wednesday 8th December 2021

Time: 10:00 – 13:00 (webinar open for admittance from 09:45)

Price: €60

CPD Points: 3

Format: Live webinar via Zoom

Recording: A recording of the webinar will be made available for a two-week period to all attendees and to ticket-holders who cannot attend on the day.

BOOK ONLINE HERE

Dublin Civic Trust's 2021 Education Programme is supported by the Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage

Dublin Civic Trust's 2021 Education Programme is supported by the Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage

WEBINAR CONTENT

This half-day webinar will explore the history, design and conservation of historic Irish windows, with an emphasis on the timber sash tradition, with two expert speakers from academic/technical and joinery trade perspectives.   

Windows are an intrinsic part of our historic built environment. Not only do they admit light to interiors and permit views to the outside world, they also comprise the public face of buildings and help shape how facades and entire streetscapes are expressed. Traditional timber windows and Ireland’s distinctive joinery tradition is a core part of our national architecture that makes us part of who we are and makes our buildings look the way they do.

This requires understanding of the joinery tradition and careful management of surviving fabric. If the subtle balance of proportion and detail of historic windows is upset or discarded, the harmony and integrity of our wider built heritage can be irreplaceably eroded. However, by understanding the historic evolution of window design, assembly and technology, it becomes possible to appreciate the joys of Ireland’s window heritage, making every journey along a road or street a stimulating delight for the eyes. Most importantly, it informs intuitive approaches to repair and conservation, ensuring original fabric and authentic design is retained for future generations.

In two lectures with opportunities for in-depth questions and answers, Nessa Roche will lead attendees through the history and evolution of Irish windows, provincial and vernacular design details. She will explore influences on design and glazing, and discuss approaches to best practice conservation and opportunities for thermal upgrading. Gary Beirne will develop these themes with a focus on common defects, repair techniques, ‘combination’ windows that utilise multiple materials, painting and decorating, site logistics and glazing. Both lectures will include documentary sources, regional variations, guidance references and multiple case studies.

 

PROGRAMME

10:00
Welcome & Introduction

10:05
A history of Irish window design, materials and construction – conservation and upgrading
Dr Nessa Roche, Senior Architectural Adviser, Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage

11:15
Q&A

11:25
Break

11:35
Conservation & Repair Approaches for Traditional Windows
Gary Beirne, Joiner, Historic Window Restoration

12:45
Q&A

13:00
Close

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES

Nessa Roche works as a senior architectural adviser with the Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage. She holds a PhD in architectural conservation from Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, on the development of the window in Ireland c.1560-c.1860 and the implications for conservation. Nessa was involved in the preparation and publication of the Architectural Heritage Protection Guidelines for Planning Authorities (2004), and has published several books and booklets including The Legacy of Light: A History of Irish Windows (Wordwell, 1999), and Windows edition of the Advice Series. She has written articles and has lectured widely on historic windows and window glass, fanlights and cabins, including authoring these entries in Volume IV of Art and Architecture of Ireland (Royal Irish Academy, 2015).

Gary Beirne is a skilled joiner and principal of Historic Window Restoration based in Newcastle West, Co. Limerick. The firm provides a window restoration service throughout Ireland using traditional joinery techniques that place strong emphasis on retaining historic material and working with the original window design and fabric. Projects have included the significant refurbishment of Adare Manor in Co. Limerick, Loughton House in Co. Offaly, to churches and thatched cottages. Gary’s firm was awarded “Best Specialist Window Restorations Experts” in the 2021 Irish Enterprise Awards and continues to expand its services with an ethos of promoting excellence on conservation practice.

Nessa Roche and Gary Beirne

Nessa Roche and Gary Beirne

PREVIOUS EVENTS

Thermal Upgrading of Traditional Buildings: Management Solutions and Fabric Upgrade of Walls & Suspended Timber Floors

Morning Webinar 

Date: Thursday 21st October 2021

Time: 10:00 – 13:00 (webinar open for admittance from 09:45)

Price: €60

CPD Points: 3

Format: Live webinar via Zoom

Recording: A recording of the webinar will be made available for a two-week period to all attendees and to ticket-holders who cannot attend on the day.

BOOK ONLINE HERE

Dublin Civic Trust's 2021 Education Programme is supported by the Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage

Dublin Civic Trust's 2021 Education Programme is supported by the Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage

WEBINAR CONTENT

This half-day webinar will explore two complementary approaches to thermally improving traditional buildings: through economical, low-intensity management solutions and through primary fabric upgrade, with two authoritiative speakers in their fields.

Three presentations, led by Sarah Khan, Specialist Conservation Architect with Roger Mears Architects, London and Niall Crosson, Group Technical Manager with Ecological Building Systems, Co. Meath, will contrast low intervention strategies for making buildings more thermally efficient with sensitive physical interventions: both in the context of the ‘breathable’ attributes of traditional construction and the need to preserve the special character of Protected Structures.

Sarah Khan will explore ‘Learning from History: Traditional Low-Energy Approaches to Comfort’ through assessing documentary sources and surviving historic fabric. Sarah will explain her recent pioneering study into management solutions employed in a typical Georgian office building to improve internal comfort and energy efficiency – both for heating and cooling – without the need for expensive or invasive fabric upgrade. The presentation will highlight how localised heating, cooling and lighting can dramatically improve actual and perceived levels of comfort and cost efficiency for both building occupiers and managers, reducing reliance on artificial energy sources which are often carbon-intensive.  

Niall Crosson, in two in-depth presentations, will explore best practice approaches to thermal upgrading of walls and suspended timber floors. Niall will discuss the impact of moisture on solid stone/brick walls, consider the causes of moisture ingress, and assess how walls function before and after applying insulation and the importance of utilising compatible materials.  His second presentation will provide a range of breathable thermal solutions for a best practice approach to the thermal refurbishment of suspended timber floors, ensuring the retention of historic fabric and maintaining vapour-permability.

 

PROGRAMME

10:00
Welcome & Introduction

10:05
Learning from History: Applying Traditional Low-Energy Approaches to Comfort
Sarah Khan, Specialist Conservation Architect, Roger Mears Architects

Q&A

11:05
Break

11:15
Breathable Internal Wall Insulation Systems for Traditional Masonry Walls
Niall Crosson, Group Technical Manager, Ecological Buildings Systems

Q&A

12:15
Break

12:20
Breathable Solutions for Thermally Upgrading Existing Floors
Niall Crosson, Group Technical Manager, Ecological Buildings Systems

Q&A

13:00
Close

Thermal upgrading of solid walls and suspended timber floors

Thermal upgrading of solid walls and suspended timber floors

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES

Sarah Khan is a Partner at Roger Mears Architects. The practice’s core work is with traditional buildings of all types, including period properties, with many projects having won awards. Sarah is an Architect Accredited in Building Conservation (AABC) as well as a RIBA accredited Specialist Conservation Architect. She is also a RIBA conservation group panel member. Sarah is currently leading the practice’s research into sustainable upgrading of historic buildings and is the lead consultant for many Buildings at Risk as well as grant funded projects. Her ethos centres on identifying the potential of historic buildings and to work with clients and communities to deliver the care these buildings need.

Niall Crosson is Group Technical Manager with Ecological Building Systems. He holds a degree as a Bachelor of Technology and a Masters Eng. Sc. He is also a Certified Passivhaus Consultant and board member of Irish Green Building Council. Niall has provided guidance on several national standard committees and provides input to several working groups with the IGBC and the UK Centre for Moisture in Buildings. His expertise is in the area of building physics, energy conservation, hygrothermal analysis, airtightness, natural insulation, and breathable moisture open construction principles.

Niall has provided guidance to many award-winning new-build and retrofit projects in Ireland and the UK. He has also co-authored and authored chapters for a number of low energy building publications including The Passivhaus Handbook and The Passivhaus Designers Manual. His own Passivhaus features in the latest issue of the publication Understanding Passivhaus by Emma Walshaw.

Sarah Khan + Niall Crosson

Sarah Khan + Niall Crosson

Climate Adaptation for Built Heritage - Meeting the Challenges

Morning Webinar 

Date: Wednesday 15th September 2021

Time: 10:00 – 13:00 (webinar open for admittance from 09:45)

Price: €60

CPD Points: 3

Format: Live webinar via Zoom

Recording: A recording of the webinar will be made available for a two-week period to all attendees and to ticket-holders who cannot attend on the day.

BOOKING CONCLUDED

Dublin Civic Trust's 2021 Education Programme is supported by the Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage

Dublin Civic Trust's 2021 Education Programme is supported by the Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage

WEBINAR CONTENT

This half-day webinar will explore the challenges facing Ireland’s built heritage in the context of climate change. Two leading speakers, award-winning writer Roger Hunt and architect, environmentalist and broadcaster Duncan Stewart, will highlight the global context of climate change, how it affects Ireland and its buildings, and the commitments now enshrined in Irish law. They will explore the mitigation measures required to reduce carbon load, increase thermal performance and comfort, and cater for more frequent and severe extreme weather events in a manner that is sensitive to the particular qualities of historic and traditionally constructed buildings.

The webinar will explain the basic principles of retrofitting old buildings for energy efficiency and the key issues to think about to ensure their long term sustainability, value and character. The speakers will consider a holistic approach to retrofitting and examine the materials and techniques that are compatible with the needs of old buildings.

Topic strands will include:

Climate change: What the science tells us

Legislation: Ireland’s legally binding commitments

Sectoral budgets: The part that built heritage must play

Built heritage: How old buildings and traditional materials function

Thermal upgrading: Factors to consider and case study solutions

The ‘light hand’: How to preserve the authenticity of historic character

Questions & Answers

The morning includes one 15-minute break and two opportunities for extensive Q&A.

 

PROGRAMME

10:00 Welcome & Introduction

10:05
Retrofit for Old Buildings: The Sensitive Approach
Roger Hunt, Co-author of Old House Eco Handbook

11:10
Q&A

11:25 Break

11:40
The Climate Adaption Challenge for Ireland’s Built Heritage
Duncan Stewart, Architect, Environmentalist & Broadcaster

12:40 Q&A

13:00 Close

Roger Hunt + Duncan Stewart

Roger Hunt + Duncan Stewart

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES

Roger Hunt
Roger Hunt is an award-winning writer and blogger with a particular interest in sustainable and vernacular architecture and the materials and techniques used in construction. He is the co-author of the bestselling Old House Handbook, Old House Eco Handbook and New Design For Old Buildings, all in association with the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB).

Roger lectures on building-related issues, is a judge of annual awards for new housing and has long been involved with the SPAB. His latest renovation project is a 1900 house on Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, USA.

Read more at www.huntwriter.com or follow on Twitter and Instagram or link with Roger on LinkedIn.

 

Duncan Stewart
Duncan Stewart is an award-winning architect and television producer and has been a leading Irish advocate for environmental, health and conservation issues for over 40 years.

Duncan produces and presents Ireland's longest running environmental series EcoEye which is now broadcasting its 19th season. One of the most popular television shows on Irish television with 150 episodes produced, he has examined environmental issues both home and abroad.

Duncan is Ireland's leading speaker on climate change, biodiversity, natural capital, the circular economy and renewable energy as well as a variety of topics revolving around our interaction as people with our natural surroundings. Duncan holds a keen interest in Ireland’s built heritage as a social, cultural and environmental resource that requires particular care to ensure its survival and active use.

 

Old House Eco Handbook is a practical and essential guide to retrofitting for energy efficiency and sustainability. Whether your project is medieval, or a Georgian, Victorian, or Edwardian terrace, it can be made more energy efficient and sustainable. Highly illustrated and with a foreword by Kevin McCloud, Old House Eco Handbook includes chapters on the building envelope; roofs and ceilings; windows and doors; walls; floors; paints; energy, air and water; plus, a chapter on retrofit materials.

The Old House Eco Handbook can be purchased online here

Facade Repairs to Heritage Buildings - Brick, Stone & Render

Date: Thursday 17th June 2021

Time: 10:00 – 13:15 (webinar open for admittance from 09:45)

Price: €60

CPD Points: 3

Format: Live webinar via Zoom

Recording: A recording of the webinar will be made available for a two-week period to all attendees and to ticket-holders who cannot attend on the day.

BOOK ONLINE HERE

Oldstone carring out repairs to 1740s Ardbraccan limestone facade of Leinster House

Oldstone carring out repairs to 1740s Ardbraccan limestone facade of Leinster House

WEBINAR CONTENT

This half-day webinar will explore the composition and repair of historic facades with Jimmy O’Friel, Director of Oldstone Conservation – one of Ireland’s most experienced building conservation contractors.

Over three 45-minute lectures, with regular opportunities for Q&A, Jimmy O’Friel will explore the major strands of historic masonry - stone, brick and render – from the perspective of the building contractor and specifier. Themes will include material identification, properties of stone, brick and render, traditional assembly techniques, common defects, repair methodologies, proprietary and bespoke repair products and case studies.

Individual strands will include:

Stone identification, delamination and erosion, raking out, pointing and jointing, splice and plastic repairs, cleaning.

Brick properties, decay and weathering, pointing and mortar identification, replacement and plastic repair, colouring and tinting.

Render properties, lime specification and aggregates, common defects, repair versus replacement, dowel repairs, colouring.

Case studies will include major works at Leinster House and Kilmainham Courthouse, Dublin, and a variety of 18th and 19th-century brick and stone buildings.

The morning includes two ten-minute breaks and three opportunities for Q&A.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY

Jimmy O’Friel is Director/owner of Oldstone Conservation with over 30 years’ experience in conservation and construction. A civil engineering graduate from Trinity College Dublin, he holds a postgraduate diploma in Business and IT and continues to enhance his expertise and experience in conservation works through the attendance of lectures, courses and workshops.

Jimmy founded Oldstone Conservation in 2010 with the aim of providing a professional contracting service in the field of conservation and restoration. Since then, the company has steadily grown and developed into a leading conservation contractor trusted to work on landmark buildings such as Leinster House, the General Post Office, Kilmainham Gaol, Belgard Castle as well as other historic buildings in Trinity College, Merrion Square and Henrietta Street. 

The firm employs a range of specialists including stonemasons, bricklayers, lime renderers, facade cleaners and skilled conservation operatives. It takes pride in its skilled and loyal staff, all of whom are highly experienced and enhance their knowledge on traditional building skills and techniques with every project undertaken.

Jimmy O'Friel, Director, Oldstone

Jimmy O'Friel, Director, Oldstone

Traditional Staircases Webinar - History, Structure & Approaches to Repair

Date: Wednesday 28th April 2021

Time: 10:00 – 13:30 (webinar open for admittance from 09:45)

Price: €60

CPD Points: 3

Format: Live webinar via Zoom

Recording: A recording of the webinar will be made available for a two-week period to all attendees and to ticket-holders who cannot attend on the day.

 

BOOK ONLINE HERE

Dublin staircase with slender balustrade and handrail, c.1810-20.

Dublin staircase with slender balustrade and handrail, c.1810-20.

WEBINAR CONTENT

This half-day webinar will explore the historic evolution, construction techniques and appropriate repair methods for traditional timber staircases of the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries.

Staircases are complex joinery assemblies that often compose the most important functional and decorative installation in a period building. Their architectural and structural composition evolved considerably over the period 1660-1900 in response to changing fashions and technological innovations. Stylistic development and mechanisation called for new approaches to wood turning, assembly and decorative enrichment, while the requirements of speculative builders and specifications for public and private buildings called for a varied use of materials and structural designs that responded to individual space requirements.

Traditional staircases are often poorly understood, regularly leading to partial or wholesale replacement during refurbishment works rather than considerate and usually more economical repair. This half-day webinar, featuring four expert speakers with particular knowledge of staircases, including a joinery practitioner, cabinetmaker, conservation architects and researchers of the field, will provide a unique insight into Irish staircase assembly and outline practical approaches to repair.

The webinar will provide an invaluable opportunity for professional specifiers, conservators, historic building owners and managers, homeowners and interested members of the public to learn from histories and case studies that will chart common characteristics of Irish stairs, including forms and components, defects and approaches to repair. Four opportunities for questions and answers will allow for audience engagement and exchange.

 

PROGRAMME

10:00 Welcome & Introduction

10:05
Design and Construction of Staircases of the late 17th and early 18th centuries
Peter Keenahan, Architect

Q&A

11:00 Break

11:10
Anatomy of Staircases, 1700 - 1900, and repair considerations
James Kelly, Architect

11:55 Q&A

12:05 Break

12:15
Approaches to Repairing Traditional Staircases: Case Studies
Pat Lynch, Director, MacLyn Conservation Joinery

12:45
Handrails, Balustrades and Polish: Diagnosis, Repairs and Finishing
George Williams, Cabinetmaker - George Williams Antiques

13:15 Q&A

13:30 Close

 

1680s staircase, Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Dublin

1680s staircase, Royal Hospital Kilmainham, Dublin

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES

Peter Keenahan, MRIAI, runs an architectural practice based in Kilmainham. Peter’s research interest focuses on the urban gabled house tradition and other early buildings of the 17th and early 18th centuries, on which he is currently co-writing a seminal publication for Dublin Civic Trust.

James Kelly, MRIAI, MRIBA, is principal at Kelly & Cogan Architects, a Conservation Grade 1-accredited architectural practice that specialises in the conservation of buildings primarily of the 18th and 19th centuries. James’s most recent projects include 3 Henrietta Street, 1 Capel Street and 18 Ormond Quay Upper.

Pat Lynch is director of Maclyn Conservation Joinery and is a joiner with over 35 years’ experience in conserving and restoring decorative and functional period joinery. His firm has worked on projects as diverse as 17th-century staircases to sash windows, doorcases and interior joinery from the Georgian period to the present.

George Williams is an antique dealer, cabinetmaker and conservator who specialises in the furnishings and interior elements of the Irish Georgian and Regency periods. His business George Williams Antiques is based outside Kells, Co. Meath where he offers a full range of antique restoration and upholstery services and also holds training courses on these subjects.

Traditional Paint and the Use of Colour
1700 - 1955

Half-day Webinar

Led by: Patrick Baty, Historic Paint Consultant

Date: Thursday 11th March 2021

Time: 10:00 – 13:30 (webinar open for admittance from 09:45)

Price: €70

CPD Points: 3.5

Format: Webinar via Zoom

Recording: A recording of the webinar will be made available for a two-week period to all attendees, and to ticket-holders who cannot attend on the day.

BOOK ONLINE HERE

Railings of London's Foreign Office before and after reinstatement of original Venetian Red paint, identified by Patrick Baty

Railings of London's Foreign Office before and after reinstatement of original Venetian Red paint, identified by Patrick Baty

WEBINAR CONTENT

This morning webinar will provide a unique opportunity to learn about the composition and use of traditional paint from a leading expert in the field.

Historic paint consultant Patrick Baty, one of the most respected international authorities on traditional pigments and their decorative application, will give a rare half-day series of lectures for an Irish audience. The morning programme will initially guide attendees through the make-up of traditional paint, including pigments, binders and solutions, and how this influenced the manufacture of paint and the development of colour. The use and application of paint will follow in two in-depth lectures, exploring how technology and fashion influenced decorative conventions, palettes and notions of colour theory in the period spanning 1700-1955 - giving attendees a unique insight into the decoration of the historic interior and exterior elements.

The webinar will provide an invaluable opportunity for professional specifiers, conservators, historic building owners and managers, homeowners and interested members of the public to learn from a leading expert with decades of experience in this fascinating arena. Three opportunities for questions and answers will allow for audience engagement and exchange.

Find the full programme below.

Handel House Museum with original wall colouring reinstated by Patrick Baty

Handel House Museum with original wall colouring reinstated by Patrick Baty

PROGRAMME

10.00 Welcome & Introduction

10:05 Paint in a Nutshell

  • What paint is – pigment and binder
  • The use of paint – decoration, protection and identity
  • Pigments – sources

Principal pigments in use by the housepainter 1750-1850

Black: Lamp Black, Ivory lack; Blue Black

Blue: Blue Verditer, Indigo, Prussian Blue

Brown: Siennas; Umbers; Vandyke Brown

Green: Verdigris; Green Verditer

Red: Red Lakes; Vermilion; Red Ochres; Red Lead

White: White Lead; Spanish White / Whiting

Yellow: Naples Yellow; Patent Yellow; Chrome Yellow; Yellow Lakes; Yellow Ochre

  • Binders – properties required and oils used
  • Driers – metallic compounds and pigments
  • Thinners
  • Brief introduction to distempers and limewash

11:00     Q&A

11:10     Break

11:20    The Use of Colour c.1700-1820

  • Decorative conventions of the period
  • How one knows what colours were used
  • The palette of colours used and the hierarchy of colour

12:10     Q&A

12:20     Break

12:30   The Use of Colour c.1820-1955

  • The nature of the room changed
  • How one knows what colours were used
  • The introduction of new pigments
  • Influence of Goethe
  • Early attempts to standardise colour and the work of natural scientists
  • Notions of colour theory and the effect on decoration
  • Further attempts to standardise colour
  • The introduction and development of the British Standard
  • The decoration of post war primary schools and its effect on paint colours

 

13:20     Q&A

13:30     Close

'The Anatomy of Colour' by Patrick Baty, published by Thames + Hudson

'The Anatomy of Colour' by Patrick Baty, published by Thames + Hudson

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY

Patrick Baty is a leading UK-based paint consultant interested in the decoration of historic buildings. His work covers research, paint analysis, colour and technical advice, and colour surveys. Projects have covered a 400-year period and have ranged widely, from 18th-century townhouses and modernist buildings to major public and private commissions. He has also worked in the USA.

Patrick lectures on a variety of subjects and has published numerous articles, also contributing to and revising several books on colour and decoration. In 2017 his The Anatomy of Colour was published by Thames & Hudson, who are also publishing his Nature’s Palette in April 2021. He and his wife run the family business Papers and Paints.

- Papers and Paints Website

- The Anatomy of Colour

BOOK ONLINE HERE

Patrick Baty

Patrick Baty

Repair and Thermal Upgrading of Metal Windows, Doors, Screens and Rooflights

Half-day Webinar

Led by: Alexander Downes, Director, Lambstongue

Date: Thursday 4th February 2021

Time: 10:00 – 13:00
(webinar open for admittance from 09:45)

Price: €60

CPD Points: 3

Format: Webinar via Zoom

Recording: A time-limited recording of the webinar will be made available to attendees and ticket-holders who cannot attend on the day.

BOOKING NOW CLOSED

Webinar Content

This morning webinar will provide a stimulating opportunity to learn about the fast-developing field of metal window, door and glazed rooflight repair, conservation and thermal upgrading, from the leading firm in Ireland operating in this field.

Metal-framed fenestration can be found in buildings of all periods in Ireland, from medieval buildings with fragments of original and later fabric, to  Georgian casements and sashes, to high Victorian and Edwardian revivalist structures hosting an eclectic variety of window types and combination framing. Modern movement buildings are especially known for their dynamic application of the slender qualities of metal-framed glazing, doors and screens. A uniting theme with most of these buildings is the common use of top-lighting in roofs and ceilings, especially in public and commercial premises, deployed in a variety of forms and materials to create lantern domes, clerestory glazing and ‘laylights’.

Until recently, the conservation and thermal upgrading of these metal-framed elements was poorly understood and regularly considered beyond repair, with fabric commonly replaced en masse with proprietary versions of the original.

Through careful on-site assessment, on-site and workshop repair, and the application of new thermal upgrading and painting technologies, Lambstongue has revolutionised this sector of building conservation, allowing original fabric, profiles and detailing to be retained and sensitively enhanced. In turn, the growing demand for new-made windows, doors and screens is testament to the timeless qualities of these elements for contemporary use.

In this morning seminar, comprising three 45-minute presentations with opportunities for Q&A, Alexander Downes will explore the history and composition of metal-framed windows and rooflights through the assessment of materials, documentary evidence and a host of case studies.

c.1920s steel-framed window undergoing workshop repair

c.1920s steel-framed window undergoing workshop repair

PROGRAMME

10.00 Welcome & Introduction

10:05 History of metal in windows, historic examples and identifying materials including steel, iron, brass, bronze

Q&A

11.00 Break

11.10 Repair, conservation and thermal upgrading of historic metal windows and doors, including contemporary replacement. Draught-proofing, double-glazing, secondary glazing and thermal breaks.

Q&A

12.05 Break

12.15 Restoration of rooflights and opening mechanisms, including major case studies such as Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire.

Q&A

13:15 Close

 

 

LAMBSTONGUE

Lambstongue is a Dublin-based Irish company that specialises in the repair and manufacture of traditional timber and metal windows, rooflights and glazed screens with a strong design and conservation sensibility. In addition to the firm’s experience in traditional joinery, it has pioneered expertise in the conservation and thermal upgrading of metal doors and windows, working with steel, cast-iron, bronze and leadwork.

The firm has recently completed an extensive contract for sash window repair and secondary glazing in Leinster House, home of the Oireachtas, rooflight repair in Iveagh House, St. Stephen's Green and the Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire, as well as works in the Royal College of Surgeons, the Four Courts and Bank of Ireland, College Green.

Traditional Dublin Shop Buildings
Approaches to Conservation & Repair – 4 Case Studies  

Half-day Webinar

Led by: James Kelly, MRIAI, MRIBA, Conservation Grade I, Kelly & Cogan Architects

Date: Tuesday 17th November 2020

Time: 10:00 – 13:00
(webinar open for admittance from 09:45)

Price: €60

CPD Points: 3

Format: Webinar via Zoom

Recording: A recorded video link will be provided to those who cannot attend on the day

BOOKING CLOSED

 

Webinar Content

This half-day seminar led by architect James Kelly, Conservation Grade I, will explore the history, construction and use of shop buildings in Dublin in the 18th and 19th centuries through four building case studies that recently involved major conservation and repair works.

Terraced shop buildings comprise the essential building blocks of Dublin’s streets and are an intrinsic part of urban fabric across Ireland’s towns and cities. Their design, layout and construction, typically consisting of brick and masonry structures with living accommodation over ground floor shops and basements, comprise a distinctive building typology that is rarely the focus of architectural study, spatial assessment for living, or creative property investment.

These buildings also present unique design challenges, often exhibiting evidence of conversion from a former residential use, and periodic structural and decorative adaption to keep pace with fashion and changing tenancies – all of which requires careful assessment to understand and preserve authentic layers while accommodating modern-day requirements. The civic contribution that well-presented and conserved historic shop buildings make to urban amenity and economic life is a critical role in its own right.

In this morning seminar, comprising three 45-minute presentations with opportunities for Q&A, James Kelly will explore the historic evolution, stylistic influences and construction of shop buildings in Dublin during the 18th and early 19th centuries. Through the use of case studies of recent building restorations overseen by Kelly & Cogan, James Kelly will discuss the unique attributes, shared characteristics and conservation design challenges of four historic street buildings including 1 Capel Street, 32 Bachelors Walk and 18 Ormond Quay Upper. One lecture shall comprise a detailed overview of the two-year conservation of the internationally significant Thomas Read’s Cutlers of 4 Parliament Street, one of the most intact Georgian shop buildings surviving in Ireland and Britain.

Topics: Retailing history, urban planning, shop and shopfront design, material culture, brick construction and repair, historic joinery and signage, living accommodation, structural repair and intervention, servicing, conservation philosophy.

PROGRAMME

10.00
Welcome & Introduction

10:05
Adapting the city for the consumer age: shops and shopping in 18th and 19th century Dublin

Q&A

11.00 Break

11.10
Case Study 1: Thomas Read’s Cutlers, 4 Parliament Street

Q&A

12:05 Break

12.15
Case Study 2: 32 Bachelors Walk  
Case Study 3: 18 Ormond Quay Upper
Case Study 4: 1 Capel Street

Q&A

13.15 Close

CPD Points: 3

Energy Efficiency Improvements for Traditionally Constructed Buildings

Half-day Webinar

Led by: Dr Moses Jenkins, Senior Technical Officer,
             Historic Environment Scotland

Date: Thursday 29th October 2020

Time: 09:30 – 13:40
(webinar open for admittance from 09:15)

Price: €75

CPD Points: 4

Format: Webinar via Zoom

Recording: A recorded video link will be provided to those who cannot attend on the day

BOOK ONLINE HERE

 

Webinar Content

This half-day seminar will explore practical solutions to improving energy efficiency in traditional and historic buildings in the context of global climate change and the growing body of research in the field developed by Historic Environment Scotland (HES) over the past 15 years. HES has been an international leader in developing best practice solutions for thermal upgrading of historic buildings and has informed policy guidance in many countries across Europe, including in Ireland. Dr Moses Jenkins has led much of this research and is widely respected internationally for the breadth of his expertise and clear communication of the subject.

In a series of live online lectures with opportunities for questions and answers, Dr Moses Jenkins will explore moisture, ventilation and temperature management in historic buildings and explain a range of specific fabric improvement measures that may be undertaken to different elements of a building. Specifically, these will include thermal upgrading to roofs and attics, floors, windows and doors, walls and chimneys, and the materials and products now commonly available for such works. Crucially, the methods outlined are designed to allow old buildings to continue to function in terms of maintaining ventilation and moisture permeability, retaining historic character and minimising the visual impact of the changes.

Dr Jenkins will explore case studies from a series of trials and pilot projects undertaken or managed by HES in which energy saving measures were applied in a variety of traditional properties throughout Scotland, including detached rural cottages, tenement flats, townhouses and public buildings dating from the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries. Many of the principles are applicable to the solid wall construction of most Irish traditional buildings, in both urban and rural settings, and to the similarity of windy and moisture-laden climates between Scotland and many parts of Ireland.

Late 19th-century terraced house, Co Louth

Late 19th-century terraced house, Co Louth

PROGRAMME

09.30
Welcome & Introduction

09:35
Traditional Buildings, Moisture and Ventilation

10.25 Break

10.35
Insulating Traditional Masonry Walls

11.25
Questions & Answers

11:40 Break

11.50
Improvement Options for Windows, Floors and Roof Spaces

12.40 Break

12.50
Standards, Specifications and Training Considerations

13.20
Questions & Answers

13.40 Close

Late Victorian terraced housing of solid wall, brick construction, Dundalk, Co. Louth

Late Victorian terraced housing of solid wall, brick construction, Dundalk, Co. Louth

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY

Dr Moses Jenkins has worked for Historic Environment Scotland for 15 years where he is Senior Technical Officer. He has written various guidance notes over this time most notably on the subjects of brick and energy efficiency. In 2009 he edited the book Building Scotland and in 2018 authored the book The Scottish Brick Industry. He gained his PhD through the study of Scottish traditional brickwork in 2017 and is a conservation accredited member of the CIOB. At present he is engaged in the development of standards and qualifications to improve knowledge of retrofit measures for traditionally constructed buildings.

 

BOOKING CLOSED

Moses Jenkins

Moses Jenkins

Structural Repair of Historic Buildings

Half-day Webinar

Led by Ian Hume, Structural Engineer, former Chief Engineer, English Heritage
DIC, CEng, MIStructE, DiplConsAA, IHBC

Date: Thursday 10th September 2020

Time: 10:00 – 13:00
(webinar open for admittance from 09:45)

Price: €60

CPD Points: 3

Format: Webinar via Zoom

BOOK NOW

Another Opportunity...
Due to unprecedented demand and a waiting list for our 'real-world' seminar hosted with Ian Hume in January 2020, we have decided to re-run the event via a Zoom webinar this coming September. The format will be slightly modified to account for the digital format. Full details below.

Webinar Content
This stimulating morning of lectures will focus on best practice repair and structural consolidation of historic buildings. It will explore considered engineering principles that promote the retention of historic fabric and special character, based on correct identification of structural defects and their causes. Not all defective historic buildings are as hazardous as they seem, requiring careful analysis and alternative approaches to repairs to consolidate apparently unstable structures and their elements. Various permanent repair methodologies which might be applied to historic buildings will be discussed, including debate about the merits of hidden repairs as against more obvious repairs.

Topics of discussion will include:

Conservation philosophy - applying the five basic principles of conservation in a challenging environment.

Conservation engineering techniques – choosing tried and tested solutions versus new methods.

Structural monitoring - diagnosing problems and identifying correct solutions through different methods of monitoring.

Maintenance – learning the rules of regular inspection and works regimes. 

Role of Conservation Engineer - interacting with owners, occupiers, planning and conservation authorities, and other members of the team, and having the confidence and expertise to do what is right for the building.

More details below

Wall propping in a Georgian huse, c.1790, Mountjoy Square, Dublin

Wall propping in a Georgian huse, c.1790, Mountjoy Square, Dublin

SEMINAR PROGRAMME

09.45 – 10:00  Webinar open for admittance

10:00 – 13:00  3x presentation lectures with Q&A after each session
                      
  2x 10-minute breaks

Topics

Philosophy of conservation

Inspection of historic buildings

Safety on historic sites

Scaffolding and temporary works for historic buildings

Understanding the structure and what does it have to say to you?

How does a building’s history affect your thinking?

Structural monitoring and load testing

Floor loadings and their impact on historic buildings

Tying, repairs and other low intervention repair methods

Multipe case studies

BOOK NOW

 

Ian Hume Biography

Ian Hume is a leading conservation accredited engineer who has been involved in the conservation of historic buildings across the UK for 40 years. He served as Chief Engineer of the Conservation Engineering team of English Heritage from 1988 to 1998, followed by extensive work in private practice and visiting lecturing in West Dean College and UK universities. Major conservation works undertaken under Ian Hume’s instruction have included the Mausoleum at Castle Howard, the Ironbridge and Leigh Court barn in Worcestershire. He lectures frequently on conservation engineering and is an active member of the UK Conservation Accreditation Register for Engineers (CARE). 

Ian Hume

Ian Hume

Historic Floor Surfaces
Approaches to Repair, Cleaning & Conservation 

ONLINE SEMINAR
Live via Zoom               CONCLUDED

DATE: Thursday 6th August 2020

Time: 10:00 – 13:00 GMT
(online webinar open for registration from 09:45)

Format: Short Introduction
               3x 50-minute visual presentations with Q&A
               (plus 2x 10-minute breaks)

Price: €60

CPD Points: 3

Format: Webinar with selected Q&A



SEMINAR CONTENT

This live online morning seminar will explore the composition, cleaning and conservation of historic floor surfaces under the guidance of a leading conservator, Darren McClean, of McLean Conservation Associates, Glasgow.

Floors add considerably to the character of historic buildings and are often an important decorative feature, in addition to serving practical and structural functions. Floors bear the brunt of wear and tear, especially in public buildings, and can suffer considerably from service installations and changes to layout and room functions. Their repair can be a challenge where original materials are no longer available, where the original method of laying is uncertain, or where skills may be limited or unavailable.

Darren McLean will explore many types of historic floor surfaces, starting with stylistic influences and materials, moving through types of decay and damage, to approaches to careful repair, cleaning and appropriate replication where necessary. Three 50-minute visual presentations with Q&A will explore:

- Timber Floors

- Stone Floors

- Tile/Mosaic Floors

TUTOR BIOGRAPHY

Darren McLean is a respected conservator with a wealth of experience in building conservation, historic material repair, cleaning and consolidation. He has worked as a practitioner of traditional skills, an educator and an adviser, having started his conservation career with an apprenticeship in carpentry, followed some years later with an MSc in Building Conservation.

In 2010 Darren formed Timber & Lime Conservation, where he has focused on the conservation and repair of historic buildings. In 2018, he was appointed an Adjunct Assistant Professor at The University of Hong Kong to teach materials and techniques in the postgraduate conservation curriculum. He is also a guest lecturer in Strathclyde University’s Building Conservation MSc.

Latterly, Darren started McLean Conservation Associates to provide consultancy in various heritage services. In addition to traditional Scottish buildings, Darren has special interest in traditional Chinese architecture.

Clients include Historic Environment Scotland, Sir Lachlan McLean of Duart Castle, The Peter Pan Trust, Glasgow City Heritage Trust, The Prince's Trust, The National Trust for Scotland, Yangon Heritage Trust, Australian Aid, HKICON.

 

Darren McLean

Darren McLean

Historic Interiors - Understanding Materials & Finishes
Practical Approaches to Conservation 

ONLINE SEMINAR
Live via Zoom            CONCLUDED

Date: Thursday 30th July 2020

Time: 10:00 – 13:00 GMT
(online webinar open for registration from 09:30)

Format: Short Introduction
               3x 50-minute visual presentations with Q&A
               (plus 2x 10-minute breaks)

Price: €60

CPD Points: 3

Format: Webinar with selected Q&A

SEMINAR CONTENT

This live online morning seminar led by conservator, Darren McClean, of McLean Conservation Associates, Glasgow, will explore the elements, materials and finishes used in historic interiors and explore approaches to their repair and conservation.

Historic interiors of the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries, ranging from domestic to commercial, are commonly described in terms of style and architectural influences. The materials from which they are assembled and the technological innovations that brought them into being are less often explored, while their repair and conservation can be a challenge to the modern householder, contractor and specifier.

Darren McLean will explore the many facets of historic interiors through documentary sources and a variety of case studies with the aim of providing a greater understanding of ‘what you're looking at’ when approaching the conservation or refurbishment of an old interior.

Themes covered over three 50-minute visual presentations with Q&A will include:

- Plaster (Lime, Gypsum, flat, run cornices, cast architectural and decorative, Scagliola)

- Timber (Doors, Floors, walls, species, sources)

- Other wall surfaces (Lincrusta, Anaglypta)

- Stone (Floors, mantles, carvings)

- Glass

- Tile / Mosaic

- Carpet

- Linoleum

- Paint

- Wallpaper

- Electricity

- Gas

- Bathrooms

1840s interior, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin

1840s interior, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin

Thermal Upgrading of Historic Buildings
Building Fabric and Energy Service Solutions

Half-day Seminar

with Ecological Building Systems, Nilan Ireland & UK and DB Plaster

Date: Wednesday 11th March 2020

Time: 09:30 – 13:00
(registration from 09:15 – seminar includes refreshments mid-morning. Lunch is not included)

Location: Dublin Civic Trust premises, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €75

CPD Points: 3

Format: Indoor lectures and demonstration

 

SEMINAR CONTENT

This half-day seminar will explore principles and technical solutions for thermally upgrading historic buildings. The correct application of compatible, vapour-permeable materials and well-designed space heating and air handling systems is essential to work with and respect the built fabric and character of traditionally-built structures, both protected and non-protected.

There is a growing – often bewildering – array of products and methodologies for undertaking thermal upgrading, especially in the context of advancing climate change and a rapidly evolving regulatory framework. This requires a practical understanding among specifiers and building owners/managers of how historic buildings function and applicable renewable energy and M&E solutions for sensitive upgrading.

Leading speakers from Ecological Building Systems, Nilan Ireland & UK, and DB Plaster will explore these themes through lectures, case studies and practical demonstration.

DB Plaster demonstrating installation of Calsitherm climate board in 18 Ormond Quay Upper

DB Plaster demonstrating installation of Calsitherm climate board in 18 Ormond Quay Upper

LEAD SPEAKERS

Nilan Ireland & UK develops and manufactures premium-quality, energy-saving ventilation and heat pump solutions that are beneficial to the environment and provide a healthy indoor climate and low-level energy consumption. The Ireland division is headed by Maurice Falvey, a mechanical engineer with many years’ experience in renewable technologies. He has attended and completed a European-certified passive designer’s course to enhance understanding of building concepts, and has undertaken further training in renewable energies abroad in Germany, Denmark and Sweden.

Niall Crosson is Group Technical Manager at Ecological Building Systems, a leading Irish company supplying products and materials for low energy sustainable buildings. He is a Certified Passivhaus Consultant and a member of the Board of Directors of the Irish Green Building Council. He provides guidance on a number of national standard committees and to many award-winning low-energy projects in Ireland and the UK. He has also co-authored and authored chapters for a number of low energy building publications including The Passivhaus Handbook and The Passivhaus Designers Manual. Niall provides regular technical contributions to a number of construction publications including The Journal of the Royal Institute of Architects of Ireland.

DB Plaster - Natural Building Solutions are specialists in lime plaster and natural insulation with over 15 years contracting experience. Dublin-based, the firm offers a nationwide consulting and production service with projects completed from Tralee, Co. Kerry to Strangford, Co Down, as well as offering training services in insulation board installation. David Broderick has collaborated in the design of a Fetac-accredited training course in Thermal Insulation Installation and delivers this three-day course at various locations around Ireland on behalf of Greenworks.ie.

 

PROGRAMME

09:15      Registration

09:30     Welcome & Introduction

09:40     Role of Thermal Plasters in the Thermal Upgrade of Historic Buildings
               Niall Crosson, Group Technical Manager, Ecological Building Systems

10:40     Two case studies of Calsitherm application from the customer standpoint
              Graham Hickey, Conservation Director, Dublin Civic Trust

              Questions & Answers

11:00      Tea/Coffee Refreshments

11:30      Thermal Plaster Application Demonstration
              Dave Broderick, DB Plaster

12:00     Adapting renewable energy solutions/M&E in heritage buildings
              Maurice Falvey, Nilan Ireland & UK

13:00     Questions & Answers

              Close

Previous Ecological Buildings Systems lecture

Previous Ecological Buildings Systems lecture

History and Conservation of Traditional Roofing

Half-day Seminar

Date: Wednesday 13th November 2019   

Time: 09:30 – 13:00
(registration from 09:15 – seminar includes refreshments mid-morning. Lunch is not included)

Location: Dublin Civic Trust premises, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €75

CPD Points: 3

Format: Indoor lectures 

This half-day seminar will focus on the historic evolution, conservation, repair and thermal upgrading of traditional roofing, with an emphasis on urban and slate-clad roofs of the 18th and 19th centuries. Roofs are a critical element in historic structures, both protected and non-protected, providing weathering, structural stability and architectural interest. Their form and detailing is especially important in historic streetscapes where massing and authentic finishes are a key townscape component, not least in Architectural Conservation Areas. Best practice approaches to roof repair and upgrading are vital to ensure the overall health and special interest of older buildings is maintained.  

The seminar programme will feature a variety of case studies ranging from churches and terraced houses to large-scale country mansions. The seminar will include an on-location practical demonstration exploring the properties of natural slate, slate grading, sizing and cutting.

PROGRAMME

09:30     Welcome & Introduction
               Catríona Ryan, Principal Officer, Built Heritage Policy Unit
               Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht 

09:40     History of Traditional Roofing in Ireland  
               Nicki Matthews, Senior Architect, Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht

10:15       Three Case Studies: Approaches to Roof Repair and Conservation
               Kevin Blackwood, Architect, Blackwood Associates, Conservation Grade I

10:50     Questions & Answers      

11:00     Tea/coffee refreshments

11:30      St Patrick’s Cathedral – Fixing The Roof While The Sun Is Shining
              John Beauchamp, MRIBA MRIAI SCA AABC IHBC, RIAI Conservation Grade I
              Director, Benjamin+Beauchamp Architects

              Questions & Answers

12:10      Practical Approaches to Roof Repair
              Ken O’Reilly, Ken O’Reilly Roofing  

12:35      Demonstration of slate grading cutting and leading - Interactive discussion encouraged
               Ken O’Reilly, Ken O’Reilly Roofing  

13:00     Close

© Stephen Farrell Photography

© Stephen Farrell Photography

History, Repair and Cleaning of Interior Plasterwork 

Half-day Seminar

Date: Tuesday 19th November   

Time: 09:45 – 13:00
(registration from 09:30 – seminar includes refreshments mid-morning. Lunch is not included)

Location: Dublin Civic Trust premises, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €75

CPD Points: 3

Format: Indoor lectures with indoor demonstrations  

This half-day seminar focuses on the history and repair of interior plasterwork, both decorative work and flatwork. The majority of historic interiors in Ireland are finished in plain lime plaster: composed of ‘two  and three-coat work’ on walls and lath-and-plaster formulations on ceilings. This plasterwork comprises the essential fabric of our commonplace building stock – especially domestic, commercial, institutional and religious buildings – the repair of which is important to understand to ensure the protection of special character. Additionally, Ireland has a fine tradition of decorative plasterwork, ranging from modest ceiling roses and cornices, to elaborate ceiling and wall stuccowork, which requires specialist knowledge and skill to undertake its cleaning, repair and restoration.

The morning seminar will be led by Andrew Smith of Smith & Henderson Stuccodores and Frank Keohane, Chartered Building Surveyor, SCSI Grade I Conservation Surveyor. It will feature a mixture of lectures, casting demonstrations and on-site plaster cleaning in 18 Ormond Quay Upper.

PROGRAMME

Session 1: 09:45 – 11:00

Welcome & Introduction

Composition and Repair of Historic Plaster and Flatwork
Frank Keohane, Chartered Building Surveyor 

Topics: Two and three-coat work, masonry substrates, embedded timbers, lath-and-plaster studwork and ceilings, plaster mixes, thermal plasters and general upgrading, plaster specification

Questions & Answers

11:00 Tea/Coffee refreshments

Session 2 11:30 - 13:00

History of Decorative Plaster and Approaches to Repair and Conservation
Andrew Smith, Stuccodore

Topics: Rococo and neoclassical styles, integrated decorative interiors, composition of decorative plaster, paint specification, paint removal and plaster cleaning, casting and freehand work

Demonstration: Bench casting of plaster elements, and paint removal from original rococo cornice in 18 Ormond Quay.

13:00 Close

Repair challenge presented by failure of decorative plaster ceiling

Repair challenge presented by failure of decorative plaster ceiling

Workshop seminar and visit
Lambstongue Window Conservation Specialists

Half-Day Seminar

Date: Thursday 21st November

Time: 10:00 - 13:00
(registration from 09:45 at the front door)

Location: Lambstongue workshop, G7, Chapelizod Industrial Estate, Chapelizod, Dublin 20
(attendees to provide their own transport or car-pool)  

Price: €75

CPD Points: 3

Format: Indoor presentations and workshop inspection

This morning seminar will provide a stimulating opportunity to visit one of the largest building conservation workshops in Ireland, at the headquarters of Lambstongue, historic window specialists, in Chapelizod.

Lambstongue specialises in the repair and manufacture of traditional timber and metal windows, rooflights and glazed screens with a strong design and conservation sensibility. In addition to the firm’s specialisation in traditional joinery, it has pioneered expertise in the conservation and thermal upgrading of metal doors and windows, working with steel, cast-iron, bronze and leadwork. It has recently completed an extensive contract for sash window repair and secondary glazing in Leinster House, with current work including Iveagh House, Royal College of Surgeons and the Four Courts.

This is a rare opportunity to explore their workshop, with lecture-style presentations, demonstrations and craft inspections, including: traditional joinery, sash window repair, glazing, stained glass and leadwork, working with bronze, steel and aluminium, and thermal upgrading.

Mid-morning refreshments provided. Lunch is not included.

 

Directions
Lambstongue's workshop is located in Unit G7 in the Chapelizod Industrial Estate, Dublin 20, the entrance of which is located on the Chapelizod Road almost opposite St. Patrick's National School. Unit G7 is located at the far end (eastern end) of the estate where parking is available.

The estate is served by Dublin Bus routes 25, 26, 66, 66A, 66B and 67 which have a stop directly at the entrance to the estate.

Shop windows for 18 Ormond Quay Upper under manufacture by Lambstongue

Shop windows for 18 Ormond Quay Upper under manufacture by Lambstongue

Repair & Conservation of Traditional Ironwork

Half-day Seminar

Date: Wednesday 6th November 2019   

Time: 09:30 – 13:00
(registration from 09:15 – seminar includes refreshments mid-morning. Lunch is not included)

Location: Dublin Civic Trust premises, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €75

CPD Points: 3

Format: Indoor lectures and exterior demonstration

This half-day seminar will provide a unique opportunity to learn from one of Ireland’s leading traditional blacksmiths, Paul Devlin of Pristine Ironwork, in an engaging morning of lectures and a live blacksmithing demonstration. Topics discussed will include the properties of wrought and cast-iron, common ironwork defects, approaches to repair and conservation, and specification of paint finishes.

The event will include practical and technical demonstration from Paul Devlin and expert advice from Frank Keohane, an experienced conservation surveyor and author of Dublin Civic Trust’s ‘Irish Period Houses: A Conservation Guidance Manual’.    

 

Traditional blacksmithing with Paul Devlin

Traditional blacksmithing with Paul Devlin

Repair and cleaning of historic facades and masonry with PMAC conservation contractors 

Half-day Seminar

Date: Friday 11th October 2019

Time: 09:45 – 13:00
(registration from 09:30 – seminar includes refreshments mid-morning. Lunch is not included)

Location: Dublin Civic Trust premises, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €75

CPD Points: 3

Format: Primarily indoor lectures with some exterior demonstrations

Details
This half-day seminar is hosted by Dublin Civic Trust in conjunction with PMAC specialist cleaning, conservation and restoration contractors. PMAC a leading Irish company in the field of sensitive repair and cleaning of historic masonry elements, from stone, brick and render, to entire historic building facades including The Gresham Hotel, O’Connell Bridge, churches and shopfronts. PMAC is a registered Heritage Contractor and an ISO 9001:2015 Quality Management System certified company.

The event will include presentation-led lectures by Peter MacNamara, PMAC Managing Director,
and a live outdoor demonstration of specialist cleaning techniques.

 
PROGRAMME

09:45 - 11:00
Identification of masonry substrates and pollution/contamination types  

Appropriate cleaning solutions: water, steam, chemical and abrasive options

Historic building facade case studies

Managing graffiti on historic surfaces: cleaning solutions, repellent coats

Questions & Answers

11:00
Tea/Coffee refreshments

11:30 - 13:00
Stone, brick and concrete repair

Concrete and marble floors

Live demonstration of cleaning solutions (outside)

PMAC removing contamination from historic Drumcondra bridge

PMAC removing contamination from historic Drumcondra bridge

History and Conservation of Traditional Brickwork

Half-day Seminar

Date: Wednesday 2nd October 2019  

Time: 09:30 – 13:00
(registration from 09:15 – seminar includes refreshments mid-morning. Lunch is not included)

Location: Dublin Civic Trust premises, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €75

CPD Points: 3

Format: Indoor lectures 

Details
This half-day seminar will focus on the history, use and repair of brick as a building material in historic structures. Brick is a core constituent in the built heritage of Dublin and forms an important part of traditional construction in many parts of Ireland.

Understanding of its origins, its make-up and use in historic buildings is essential to ensure proper standards of repair and conservation. This morning seminar will feature leading traditional brick expert speakers and practioners, including a live demonstration of traditional brick pointing techniques.


PROGRAMME

09:30    
Welcome & Introduction

09:40    
An Introduction to Ireland's Brickmaking History 
Susan Roundtree, retired Conservation Architect
& author of upcoming gazetteer on Irish brickwork (to be published 2020)

10:20    
Brick construction: common attributes, defects and approaches to conservation
James Kelly, Conservation Architect, Kelly & Cogan Architects

10:50    
Questions & Answers      

11:00
Tea/coffee refreshments

11:30
Techniques for repair and manufacture of brick, terracotta and application of traditional brick pointing.
Including multiple case studies.
Shane Nolan, Nolan Group conservation contractors

12:15    
Questions & Answers

12:25    
Live brick pointing demonstration with Nolan Group
Interactive discussion encouraged

13:00    
Close

 

Traditional Irish wigging by Nolans Group

Traditional Irish wigging by Nolans Group

The Nineteenth-Century Decorative Interior

Half-Day Seminar


Date: Tuesday 14th May 2019

Time: 09.15 - 13.30                                                                   

Location: Dublin Civic Trust, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 1

Tickets: €65

FULLY BOOKED

 

This half-day seminar, hosted in the newly decorated 1840s interiors of 18 Ormond Quay Upper, explores the evolution of Dublin’s decorative interiors as they transitioned from the age of Regency to the Victorian period. An array of expert speakers will focus on domestic and ‘merchant’ interiors of the 1820-1870 era, with topics ranging from wallpaper, furnishing, material culture and the economics of domestic development. The seminar coincides with the launch of a new range of historic Irish wallpapers by David Skinner, wallpaper specialist, which will be exhibited later in June in the ground floor of 18 Ormond Quay Upper.

The seminar includes a tour of 18 Ormond Quay and tea/coffee refreshments.

See programme below.

Sample of David Skinner wallpaper, originally patented in 1841 by James Boswell, paper-stainer of Bachelors Walk, Dublin

Sample of David Skinner wallpaper, originally patented in 1841 by James Boswell, paper-stainer of Bachelors Walk, Dublin

PROGRAMME


09.15 - 09.30
Registration

09.30                                   
History of Irish wallpapers – fashion and style
David Skinner, Historic Wallpaper Specialist   

10.00                                   
Decorative interiors 1830-1870 - applying the principles to 18 Ormond Quay Upper
Graham Hickey, Conservation Director, Dublin Civic Trust

10.30                                    
The Dublin shop, the Wide Streets Commission and the merchant interior                                      
Sarah Foster, Lecturer in the history of design,
CIT Crawford College of Art & Design, Cork

11:00                                    
Tea/Coffee Break

11.30                                    
Dressing the domestic interior - nineteenth-century Irish furniture makers
George Williams, Antique Dealer and Conservator

12.00                                    
System decorating and the early-nineteenth century interior
Conor Lucey, Assistant Professor, School of Art History and Cultural Policy, UCD

12:30                                    
The Dublin 'paper-stainers'  
David Skinner, Historic Wallpaper Specialist                                                     

13:00                                    
Discussion & Tour of 18 Ormond Quay Upper

Greek revival, cast-iron chimneypiece, 18 Ormond Quay Upper

Greek revival, cast-iron chimneypiece, 18 Ormond Quay Upper

SPEAKERS

David Skinner is Ireland’s leading expert on traditional wallpapers. For over twenty years his firm has been researching and printing Irish historic wallpapers, and is constantly adding to a collection of patterns and borders reproduced from original designs found in Irish houses of the Georgian and Victorian periods. David’s unique archive of Irish period papers is the source of the collection which includes classic damasks, a late nineteenth-century pattern of shamrocks, Regency stripes, Gothic patterns and more – all of which can be printed in their original colourings, or may be custom coloured to customers’ specifications. David is author of the seminal publication Wallpaper In Ireland 1700-1900 by Churchill House Press, and he is providing the historic wallpapers for 18 Ormond Quay Upper.

Graham Hickey is Conservation Director at Dublin Civic Trust. He is a graduate of Dublin Institute of Technology and a post-graduate of Applied Building Repair and Conservation from Trinity College Dublin, where his study focused on the historic development and reconstruction of the State Apartments at Dublin Castle in the period 1941-1968, subsequently contributing a chapter to the recent OPW publication Making Majesty: The Throne Room At Dublin Castle and its high William IV decoration. He was a contributor to the Architecture 1600-2000 volume of the Art and Architecture of Ireland project, focusing on nineteenth-century urban domestic development, and holds a particular interest in the architectural and decorative period 1830-1850. He is a regular writer for The Sunday Times on architectural heritage and the development of Dublin city.

Sarah Foster is Lecturer in the history and theory of design at the CIT Crawford College of Art & Design in Cork. Her paper today draws on her Royal College of Art dissertation Going Shopping in Georgian Dublin: luxury goods and the negotiation of national identity; this used a wide range of primary sources to reconstruct shopping in Dublin between 1770 and 1810, and frame it in relation to consumption and ‘patriot’ identity. She has lectured and published widely on Irish and European material culture and also acts as a peer reviewer for American, Irish and British publishers.

George Williams is an antique dealer and conservator who specialises in the furnishings and lifestyles of the Irish Georgian and Regency periods. George began his career working as a porter for his father while he was still at school and witnessed many of the contents sales of the great Irish country houses of the 20th century. This gave him first-hand experience of the furnishings of these great houses and how the furniture was displayed and constructed. In 1987 he established George Williams Antiques, and two years later bought an early 19th-century house on Capel Street which he painstakingly restored using only period materials salvaged from other houses and skips. From here, he ran George Williams Antiques before moving the business to Co Meath. George has an unrivalled knowledge of 18th and 19th-century Irish furniture and interior design and delivers many lectures on the subject. His wife Maggy is an Irish art consultant and George Williams Antiques provides advice on buying and selling antique furniture and works of art, current valuations. He offers a full range of antique restoration and upholstery services and also holds training courses on the subjects.  

Conor Lucey is Assistant Professor in the School of Art History and Cultural Policy at UCD, and President of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland. He sits on the committees of the Irish Architectural Archive and the Irish Committee for Historical Sciences. Conor is an architectural and design historian with interests in a number of fields, including urban domestic architecture of the eighteenth-century British Atlantic world; the contested relationship between architectural design and building production; and the decorative interior in Europe, 1660-1840. His latest book, Building Reputations: Architecture and the Artisan, 1750-1830 was published by Manchester University Press, and grant-aided by the National University of Ireland and an SAH/Mellon Author Award of the Society of Architectural Historians.

Parnell Square and Rotunda Hospital Conference 2018

Evaluating the Historic Urban Landscape


Date: Thursday 29th November 2018

Time: 09.00 - 16.40                                                                     

Location: The Pillar Room, Rotunda Hospital
Cavendish Row, Parnell Square East, Dublin 1

Ticket: €75
Ticket with CPD Certificate: €100
Ticket Student/Senior Citizen: €40 (proof required on the day)

Conference Theme

Dublin Civic Trust is pleased to announce details of its winter 2018 conference focusing on the history, development and future potential of Parnell Square and the Rotunda Hospital complex. The event takes place in the magnificent 18th-century setting of the little-known Pillar Room of the Rotunda Hospital, located beneath The Gate Theatre.

Sited at the northern end of O’Connell Street, Parnell Square is Dublin’s first Georgian square, developed c.1755-1795 as a series of residential terraces enclosing the grounds of the Rotunda Hospital. The square has its origins in the establishment, in 1749, of the New Pleasure Gardens, the fundraising enterprise of the Rotunda Hospital’s founder Dr Bartholomew Mosse, who attracted aristocratic patronage through annual subscriptions and concert events. The maternity hospital opened in 1757, built to the design of leading architect Richard Castle. This was followed by the construction of the great Rotunda entertaining room in the 1760s and the establishment of the New Assembly Rooms designed by Frederick Trench and Richard Johnston in the 1780s: the latter now forming part of The Gate Theatre.

The mansions surrounding the square contain some of the best examples of 18th-century interiors and decorative plasterwork in the city, complemented by modern cultural institutions including the Dublin City Gallery - The Hugh Lane. Within this historic setting, the Rotunda Hospital continues to operate its original function as a leading provider of maternity services, with various plans afoot to expand facilities or move to an alternative site in the longer term.

 

Conference Proceedings

The aim of the conference is to highlight the history and development of the square and its houses, the hospital buildings, its entertaining rooms and associated landscape. These elements in their surviving form compose an 18th-century urban complex of international significance, comprising rare early examples of a purpose-built maternity hospital, associated public rooms and remains of a unique designed landscape. Unlike other lost pleasure gardens in Europe, the built setting and relationship of this landscape to its original Georgian environment remains remarkably intact, presenting a unique opportunity for future, dynamic reinvention.

An array of national and international expert speakers will explore themes of architectural history, historic landscape design, comparative international examples of regeneration, and planned projects for the rejuvenation of Parnell Square and its buildings. The conference will also feature participation from the Rotunda Hospital.

Conference includes lunch and light refreshments.

CPD certificates are issued only to attendees who have purchased CPD tickets.

Rutland (Parnell) Square extracted from 'Dublin from the Spire of Saint George's Church' by James Mahony, 1854

Rutland (Parnell) Square extracted from 'Dublin from the Spire of Saint George's Church' by James Mahony, 1854

Conference Programme                                            

 

08.50 - 09.20  Registration

09.20                      
Welcome & Introduction
Geraldine Walsh, Chief Executive Officer, Dublin Civic Trust

09.30                                  
Opening Address
Paschal Donohoe T.D., Minister for Finance and Public Expenditure and Reform              
                                

Session I: Setting The Context      
Chaired by Niall Ó'Donnchú, Assistant Secretary, Dept. Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht

09:45                     
Dublin's North Georgian Core – Its Assets & Potential  
James Kelly, Conservation Architect & Chairman, Dublin Civic Trust

10:10                                    
Obstetrics, Spectacle and Pleasure: the Origins of the Rotunda Hospital 
Gary A. Boyd, Head of Architecture, Queen’s University Belfast

10.35
The Rotunda – Past, Present & Future
Sam Coulter-Smith, Former Master of the Rotunda Hospital, 2009-2016

10.55                                    
Discussion

11.05  Tea/Coffee Break

11.35                    
Plain Pomp: the houses of Rutland Square
Christine Casey, Professor in Architectural History, Trinity College Dublin

12.00                                     
The Rotunda Complex – Hidden In Plain View       
Graham Hickey, Conservation Director, Dublin Civic Trust

12.25         
Garden of Remembrance: a symbolic place in 1960s Parnell Square 
Ellen Rowley, Architectural & Cultural Historian      

12:50                                    
Making Dublin great - finding ways to build contemporary architecture in the Georgian core  
Niall McCullough, McCullough Mulvin Architects                                                   

13:10                                    
Discussion

13.20  Lunch

Session II: Looking to the Future  
Chaired by Paraic Fallon, Senior Planner, Dublin City Council

14.20                                   
The Future of Parnell Square – Dublin City Library & Cultural Quarter  
Yvonne Farrell, Director, Grafton Architects

14.50                                  
Reimagining the Pleasure Garden in the 21st Century
Todd Longstaffe-Gowan, Landscape Historian & Designer 

15.20                                     
Reviving the Edinburgh Assembly Rooms & The Piece Hall, Halifax 
Emma Rose Berry, Associate, LDN Architects, Scotland   

15.50
Opportunities for Sustainable Residential Communities in the Historic City Centre                   
Orla Hegarty, Architect & Assistant Professor, School of Architecture, UCD

16:20                            
Debate & Discussion
Chaired by Paraic Fallon, Senior Planner, Dublin City Council

16:40  Close

 

Thermally Upgrading Historic Buildings in the context of Climate Change

Date: Tuesday 13th November 2018

Time: 09:45 - 13:00
(registration from 09:30 – seminar includes refreshments mid-morning. Lunch is not included)

Location: Dublin Civic Trust premises, 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €60

CPD Points: 3

SPEAKERS

Duncan Stewart, Broadcaster, architect and environmentalist
Niall Crosson, Group Technical Manager, Ecological Building Systems

 

PROGRAMME

This half-day seminar will discuss the impact of climate change on Ireland and the scale of the challenge required in decarbonising the country’s building stock and wider society/economy. This places particular challenges on the thermal upgrading of historic buildings, where the use of appropriate materials and space heating solutions are required to respect the special character of traditionally-built structures, both protected and non-protected.

Two leading speakers in their respective fields will explore these issues through a combination of lectures, presentations, product demonstrations and extensive question and answer sessions. The event will be held in the 1840s merchant permises of Dublin Civic Trust, which is undergoing completion of a major conservation works programme, including the use of ‘breathable’ insulating solutions. 

Duncan Stewart is a renowned Irish broadcaster, architect and environmentalist. An award-winning architect and television producer, Duncan has been a leading Irish advocate for environmental, health and conservation issues for over 40 years. His early television programmes ‘Our House’ and ‘About the House’ leaned on his architectural background as he promoted the values of quality Irish craftsmanship, efficient and sustainable materials and the value of energy conservation.

Duncan’s current television programme ‘Eco Eye’, now in its fourteenth series, is driven by his interests in the protection of the environment, Ireland’s biodiversity, supporting local communities and the communication of climate issues.

Niall Crosson is Group Technical Manager at Ecological Building Systems, a leading Irish company supplying products and materials for low energy sustainable buildings. He is a Certified Passivhaus Consultant and a member of the Board of Directors of the Irish Green Building Council. He provides guidance on a number of national standard committees and to many award-winning low-energy projects in Ireland and the UK.

He has also co-authored and authored chapters for a number of low energy building publications including The Passivhaus Handbook and The Passivhaus Designers Manual. Niall provides regular technical contributions to a number of construction publications including The Journal of the Royal Institute of Architects of Ireland.

BOOKING CLOSED

 

Calsitherm Climate Board being applied in 18 Ormond Quay Upper replacing modern cement and gypsum-based plasters

Calsitherm Climate Board being applied in 18 Ormond Quay Upper replacing modern cement and gypsum-based plasters

Previous Events

National Biodiversity Week 2018
May Lunchtime Lectures

Hosted by Dublin Civic Trust at 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Free of charge on a first-come basis

The Liffey in the City - wildlife of Dublin’s river

Date: Tuesday 22nd May 2018
Time: 13:00 – 14:00
Location: 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Lectures
Niamh Fitzgerald, Birdwatch Ireland

Dr Julian Reynolds, Zoologist, Trinity College Dublin



Greening the City

Date: Friday 25th May 2018
Time: 13:00 – 14:00
Location: 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Lectures
The importance of city trees lecture - Dr John A. McCullen, formerly of OPW

Urban gardening - go green in the city; workshop with Rebecca Jeffares, landscape historian

Dublin's river Liffey

Dublin's river Liffey

Historic Building Site Visit: 1 Capel Street

Date: Tuesday 29th May 2018

Time: 10:00 – 12:00
(registration from 09:45 at the door of 18 Ormond Quay Upper - please note, not 1 Capel Street)

Price: €50

CPD Points: 2

This morning site visit to 1 Capel Street provides a rare opportunity to inspect the interiors of one of Dublin’s most prominent street buildings overlooking Grattan Bridge in the heart of Dublin. Constructed c.1780 and extensively modified in the 1830s, 1 Capel Street was famously captured in an engraving of Essex Bridge (now Grattan Bridge) by James Malton in the 1790s.

The guided site visit, led by its project architect James Kelly of Kelly & Cogan Architects in advance of major conservation works, will provide an opportunity to learn how to read an historic building, its layers of interventions over time, and dealing with challenging conservation and repair issues.

The session will begin with a lecture presentation hosted in 18 Ormond Quay Upper (located a few doors away, where registration at 09.45 also takes place), followed by a guided site tour of 1 Capel Street.

 

Historic Building Site Visit: 3 Henrietta Street

Date: Thursday 17th May 2018

Time: 10:00 – 12:00
(registration from 09:45 at the front door)

Price: €50

CPD Points: 2

This morning site visit is a follow-up visit to the Trust’s successful seminar on the conservation of this landmark Georgian mansion at 3 Henrietta Street held in late 2017.

Since that time, the most ambitious staircase reconstruction of its kind has taken place in the soaring double-height entrance hall which had been removed in the 20th century. The staircase project is one of the most remarkable historic reconstructions ever undertaken in Ireland, involving the structural carcassing of the ‘flying staircase’ based on exacting surviving dimensions, the carving of almost 100 balusters, heavy handrail and dado rail, and the application of salvaged, 18th-century tread-ends. Historic plasterwork has also been conserved and replicated, restoring the architectural coherence of the stair hall.  

This morning visit will allow a unique opportunity to observe the interior of this private house as the staircase is being completed, led by its project conservation architect, James Kelly of Kelly & Cogan Architects and clients, Pat Wigglesworth and Ian Lumley.

Workshop seminar and visit
Lambstongue Window Conservation Specialists

Date: Tuesday 15th May 2018

Time: 10:00 - 13:00
(registration from 09:45 at the front door)

Location: Lambstongue workshop, G7, Chapelizod Industrial Estate, Chapelizod, Dublin 20
(attendees to provide their own transport or car-pool)

Price: €95

CPD Points: 3

This morning seminar provides a stimulating opportunity to visit one of the largest building conservation workshops in Ireland, at the headquarters of Lambstongue, historic window specialists, in Chapelizod.

Lambstongue specialises in the repair and manufacture of traditional timber and metal craftwork with a strong design and conservation sensibility. In addition to the firm’s specialisation in traditional joinery, it has pioneered expertise in the conservation and thermal upgrading of metal doors and windows, working with steel, cast-iron, bronze and leadwork. It is presently involved in the repair and manufacturing of new windows for one of the largest building restoration projects in the UK at the Glasgow School of Art & Design.

This rare opportunity to explore their workshop, with live demonstrations and inspections, including: traditional joinery, sash window repair, glazing, stained glass and leadwork, working with bronze, steel and aluminium, and thermal upgrading.

Mid-morning refreshments provided. Lunch is not included.

 

Insulating Historic Buildings Seminar

Calsitherm Climate Board & Diasen Thermal Plaster Demonstration

Date: Thursday 3rd May 2018

Time: 09:30 – 13:00
(registration from 09:15 at the front door)  

Location: 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €95  

Structured CPD Points: 3

Held in association with Ecological Building Systems Ireland and DB Plaster Natural Building Solutions  

This half-day seminar, hosted in Dublin Civic Trust’s live building conservation project at 18 Ormond Quay Upper, will provide a unique opportunity to observe a live application demonstration of Calsitherm Climate Board and Diasen Thermal Plaster in a brick-built Protected Structure.  

These two open diffusion, ‘breathable’ wall insulations are growing in demand in Ireland as awareness increases about their suitability for use in historic building contexts.

This half-day seminar will include lectures focusing on the properties of each material and cases studies of their use. A live demonstration of their application in the upper floors of 18 Ormond Quay Upper will take place in two rooms where historic plaster finishes have been lost and thermal upgrading of exterior walls is required.  

The seminar will provide an excellent opportunity for exchange and dialogue with suppliers and appliers of the plaster products, and for discussion amongst conservation specialists and practitioners.

Mid-morning refreshments provided. Lunch is not included.

More information on Calsitherm and Diasen can be found here:

Ecological Building Systems Ireland
DB Plaster Natural Building Solutions

BOOKING NOW CLOSED 

Diasen Thermal Plaster using spray application

Diasen Thermal Plaster using spray application

Project 18Ormond Seminar
Conserving a Dublin merchant building 

Date: Thursday 9th November 2017

Location: 18 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7

Price: €95

Structured CPD Points: 3

Join us for this half-day seminar exploring the history, conservation philosophy and practical repair techniques being undertaken in the ongoing refurbishment of Dublin Civic Trust’s flagship building at 18 Ormond Quay Upper. The event is the first public opportunity to gain access to this major conservation project on the Liffey quays in the historic heart of Dublin.

18 Ormond Quay Upper and 67 Arran Street East comprise a pair of interlocking period buildings dating to 1843 and 1760 respectively. The first phase of this ambitious project comprises the structural consolidation and refurbishment of the river-fronting building, composed of three storeys of living accommodation above a ground floor shop and basement. It is this part of the building that will form the focus of the seminar.

To date, the project has involved the recording of architectural fabric, securing planning permission for structural repairs and exterior alterations, undertaking structural consolidation of the side wall and shopfront, the repair of facades and brick repointing, and extensive renewal of the interior staircase.

Find out more about the project and the history of the conjoined buildings here.

18 Ormond Quay Upper pictured before and visualised after restoration

18 Ormond Quay Upper pictured before and visualised after restoration

Seminar Content

This interactive morning seminar will be led by Dublin Civic Trust and by the project architect, James Kelly, MRIAI, MRIBA, Specialist Conservation Architect, of Kelly & Cogan Architects. It will provide an opportunity to learn from ongoing works and to observe the structural and material make-up of a typical Dublin street building.

The day will comprise an instructive guided tour, a series of concise lectures, and ample opportunities for discussion, questions and answers.

 

Contributors

James Kelly, Conservation Architect

Nolans Group building contractors

Geraldine Walsh & Graham Hickey, Dublin Civic Trust

 

Themes & Topics

 - Architectural/stylistic analysis

- Structural deficiencies and repair

- Brick repair and repointing, including traditional ‘wigging’

- Masonry cleaning

- Historic joinery repair

Brick cleaning underway using low pressure water application

Brick cleaning underway using low pressure water application

Details

Registration takes place from 09.45 – 10.00.

Proceedings begin at 10.00 sharp and conclude at 13.00.

Places are strictly limited and by advance booking only.

Tea/coffee refreshments will be provided mid-morning. Lunch will not be provided as the seminar will conclude at 13.00. There is a host of good cafes in the vicinity of Ormond Quay.

Importance Notice

Please note that 18 Ormond Quay Upper is an active building site. While every effort will be made to ensure a safe and comfortable visit, all attendees are advised to wear PPE clothing including steel-capped boots and high-visibility vests. PPE clothing will not be provided on-site. Any attendees with mobility impairments should contact Dublin Civic Trust in advance of attendance. Please note that unfortunately wheelchair access cannot be provided.

Pebbledash removal

Pebbledash removal

PREVIOUS EVENTS

3 Henrietta Street Visit

Conserving an 18th-century Georgian mansion  

Date: Tuesday 24th October 2017  

Location: 3 Henrietta Street, Dublin 1 

Price: €95

Structured CPD Points: 3

 

This half-day seminar will provide a unique and exciting opportunity to visit and to learn from the ongoing conservation and refurbishment of one of the grandest private houses in Dublin at Number 3 Henrietta Street. Constructed in the early 1750s as a fashionable town house on the pioneering Georgian street set out by developer Luke Gardiner, the site of the house was originally leased to developer Nathaniel Clements before being passed to John Maxwell, Baron Farnham, who may have built the house itself. Owen Wynn, an MP of Hazlewood, County Sligo, who had married Lord Farnham’s daughter in 1754, inherited the building in 1755, where it remained in family occupation until the 1820s.

The scale and quality of the mansion is outstanding in both national and international contexts. The principal reception rooms on ground and first floors are of a palatial scale, retaining embellished cornices, and lugged door architraves and window cases with egg-and-dart detailing. The first floor rear room is of exceptional quality with a coved Rococo ceiling. The second floor retains some original plaster and joinery features, while the third floor was extensively altered at various dates. The grand staircase and entrance hall that originally scaled two storeys was removed in the 1830s. Later uses included barristers’ chambers and tenement occupation.

The property was recently purchased by its present owners, who are currently undertaking a wholesale repair and conservation of the property, which was in a perilously poor condition, for residential use, to best practice standard.

Seminar Content

This interactive morning seminar will be led by the project architect, James Kelly, MRIAI, MRIBA, Specialist Conservation Architect, of Kelly & Cogan Architects. It will provide an opportunity to learn from ongoing works and to observe the structural and material make-up of a mid 18th-century Dublin town house, applicable to their repair of Georgian buildings across the city.  

The day will comprise an instructive guided tour, a series of concise lectures, and ample opportunities for discussion, questions and answers. Contributors will include:

James Kelly, Conservation Architect

Ian Lumley, co-owner

Patrick Wigglesworth, co-owner and building contractor

Geraldine Walsh & Graham Hickey, Dublin Civic Trust

 

Themes & Topics

Architectural/stylistic analysis

Structural deficiencies and repair

High status plasterwork consolidation, repair and restoration, including cornices and ceilings

Decorative finishes

Brick repair and repointing, including traditional ‘wigging’

Historic joinery repair

Details

Registration takes place from 09.45 – 10.00.

Proceedings begin at 10.00 sharp and conclude at 13.00.

Places are strictly limited and by advance booking only.

Tea/coffee refreshments will be provided mid-morning. Lunch will not be provided as the seminar will conclude at 1pm. We highly recommend the independent Blas Café in the Chocolate Factory, located across the road from Henrietta Street on Kings Inns Street: www.blascafe.ie

Importance Notice

Please note that 3 Henrietta Street is an active building site. While every effort will be made to ensure a safe and comfortable visit, all attendees are advised to wear PPE clothing including steel-capped boots and high-visibility vests. PPE clothing will not be provided on-site.

Any attendees with mobility impairments should contact Dublin Civic Trust in advance of attendance. Please note that unfortunately wheelchair access cannot be provided.

Mountjoy Square Historic Ironwork
Workshop & Seminar

Friday 22nd September 2017

Price: €95.00
Structured CPD Points: 5
Location: 65 Mountjoy Square West, Dublin 1

 

Dublin Civic Trust and The Mountjoy Square Society are pleased to announce details of a one-day seminar and live demonstration workshop showcasing the ongoing repair and conservation of the historic wrought-iron railings of Mountjoy Square, Dublin 1.

This pioneering project, one of the largest of its kind ever undertaken in Ireland, is being led by Dublin City Council’s Parks and Landscape Department as an action of its Mountjoy Square Conservation Plan – a study that was jointly commissioned with the Mountjoy Square Society in 2014.

Mountjoy Square

The wrought-iron railings of Mountjoy Square are the largest single ensemble of Georgian railings surviving within Dublin’s canal ring, erected c.1803 by the Mountjoy Square Commissioners to enclose the square’s central garden. The railings feature an axial arrangement of four centred entrance gates, a Leinster granite plinth wall and distinctive quadrant sweeps to the corners of the square - all originally mounted with a series of 84 ‘globe-iron’ lamp standards,

Unlike other Dublin squares such as Merrion Square and St. Stephen’s Green that were denuded of their original railings in the late 20th century, Mountjoy Square has retained all of its original ironwork – albeit now in an advanced state of disrepair.

Under the direction of master blacksmith Paul Devlin and conservation stonework contractors Cairn Construction, with architectural oversight from Howley Hayes Architects, the railings are currently being systematically conserved to best practice standard – moving clockwise from the Gardiner Street side.

 

Newly restored railings on Mountjoy Square

Newly restored railings on Mountjoy Square

Seminar

This one-day seminar will provide a unique opportunity to showcase the breadth and quality of the works presently being undertaken. It will allow those involved in building conservation, period building maintenance, works specification and interested members of the public to learn at first hand from the works and the experienced contractors involved.

A particular emphasis is being placed on the feasibility of reinstating the 84 'globe-iron' lamp standards that were originally integrated into the railings of Mountjoy Square - as was common to most of Dublin's Georgian squares. Braun Lighting Solutions, international leaders in historic urban lighting design, will give a presentation on successful achievements in this field in Germany and continental Europe. The seminar will also showcase the lamp-iron model that has been developed for Mountjoy Square in a collaboration between Dublin Civic Trust, The Mountjoy Square Society and Dublin City Council Parks Department.  

Details

Hosted in the magnificent 1790s rooms of a newly restored Georgian mansion at 65 Mountjoy Square West, the day takes two parts: a morning seminar of lectures exploring the history, craftsmanship, challenges and design specification of Mountjoy Square and its railings, followed by an afternoon demonstration of live metalworking hosted on-site on the west side of the square.

 

SEMINAR PROGRAMME

09.45 – 10.00
Registration

10.00 – 10.30
Mountjoy Square History & Development
Karin O’Flanagan, The Mountjoy Square Society

10.30 – 11.00
Mountjoy Square Park Conservation Plan & Railings Project
Dublin City Council Parks & Landscape Service

11.00 – 11.30
Refreshments

11.30 – 11.45
Georgian Lighting & Mountjoy Square’s ‘Globe-Irons’
Graham Hickey, Dublin Civic Trust           

11.45 - 12.20
Design-led LED lighting in the Historic Urban Environment
André Braun & Christian Zeher, Braun Lighting Solutions, Berlin

12.20 – 13.00
Mountjoy Square Railings Repair Strategy
Paul Devlin, Blacksmith

13.00 – 14.00
Lunch

14.00 – 16.00
On-site blacksmithing demonstration, west side Mountjoy Square Park
Paul Devlin & colleagues

16.00
Close

Previous course topics and themes

Structural upgrading

Structural Repair of Historic Buildings

Historic Ironwork - History, Identification & Repair

Energy Efficiency in Traditional Buildings

Traditional Windows - History, Repair and Thermal Upgrading

Structural Repairs to Derelict and Ruined Structures

Timber Decay & Damp in Historic Buildings

Historic Decorative Finishes - History, Repair and Reinstatement

Wallpaper in Ireland - History and Conservation

Historic Plaster in Ireland - Walls, Ceilings and Decorative Work

Historic Brickwork - History, Repair, Jointing and Pointing

Fanlights - History, Repair and Maintenance

Traditional Roofing - History, Repair and Conservation

Stonework in Historic Buildings - Repair and Cleaning

Mechanical and Electrical Installations in Historic Buildings

Planning Legislation - Protected Structures & Architectural Conservation Areas

Course leaders and speakers

Ian Hume, former Chief Engineer, Historic England 

Dr Gerald Lynch, Master Bricklayer

Peter Lawson Smith, OBE

Dr Brian Ridout, Ridout Associates

Edward Byrne, Traditional Lime Company

Nicki Matthews, Conservation Officer, Dublin City Council

Richard Ireland, Historic Decorative Plaster, Paint & Finishes Expert

Dr David Mitchell, Director of Conservation, Historic Environment Scotland

Sven Habermann, Manager, Conservation-Letterfrack

Chris Wood, Historic England

Contractors including MacLyn Conservation Joinery and Lambstongue

Programme of events 2017

We will be using out flagship new building conservation project at 18 Ormond Quay Upper in Dublin city centre as a centre of demonstration and learning over the course of 2017-2018.

In this prominently located historic house overlooking the river Liffey, we will be exploring traditional materials and construction, historic design elements and features, and conservation and repair techniques. This will include roofing, plasterwork, joinery and the integration of modern services.

We will be launching our programme of events later in the year. In the meantime, sign up to our newsletter and keep an eye out for social media feeds.

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT PROJECT 18ORMOND +